Syllabus for Bachelor of Social Science (BSS) programme in Mass Communication and Journalism

The Department of Mass Communication and Journalism at the University of Dhaka is regarded as the top-ranking Department of its kind in the country. Over the years it has produced brilliant graduates who are now working in the leading national newspapers and electronic media, government and nongovernmental organizations, international organizations, advertising agencies, bank and business organizations, and academic institutions.

The Department aims to ensure quality education, develop a strong sense of accuracy, fairness and diversity, and create an awareness of the rights and responsibilities of media professionals and scholars.

The Department offers a four-year undergraduate programme. It lays emphasis on the process, uses and effects of different types and forms of communication, interrelationships between media and society, structure, organization and history of mass communication, emerging forms of communication technology, international communication, techniques of media reporting and editing, and communication research methodology.

The theory, syntactics, semantics and pragmatics of mass communication are given considerable importance in the entire gamut of the academic programme. The culture and heritage of the country, political and socio-economic perspectives, and contemporary national and international affairs are well integrated into the course structure. The courses are designed so as to enable the students to have a broad view of media, society and culture, with a good grounding in the theory and practice of mass communication.

The course instructors are at the cutting edge of their profession. They are consistently serious about enhancing their knowledge and skill for the benefit of the students.

Students will take 32 courses in eight semesters. They need to earn a total of 128 credits in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of BSS.

First Semester

MCJ 101: Concepts of Communication

Objective:

The course introduces the preliminaries to human communication and forms the basis for perceiving many other aspects of the broad sphere of communication presented in the whole range of courses throughout the four-year academic programme.

Description:

It defines the meanings of communication, describes the nature, scope and purpose of communication and highlights the value of the study of communication. Throwing light on the types, forms and functions, the course explains the models of the process of communication. It discusses the self and perception, listening, verbal and nonverbal messages. The entire course is discussed in the context of culture. It touches on the changing pattern of human communication against the backdrop of rapid growth of new information technologies.

Suggested Readings:

Barker, L. (1981). Communication. New York: Prentice-Hill
Pearson, J.J. & Nelson, P. (1997). An Introduction to Human Communication. New York: McGraw Hill
Andal, N. (1998). Communication Theories and Models. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House
Mortensen, C. D. (1972). Communication-the study of human interaction. London:
McGraw Hill
DeVito, J. A. (1997). Essentials of Human Communication. New York: Pearson
Education
Berlo, D. K. (1960). The Process of Communication. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.
DeFleur, M. & Dennis, E. (1991). Understanding Mass Communication. Boston:
Houghton Mifflin.
Yoder, D., Hugenberg, L., & Wallace, S. (1993). Creating Competent Communication.
Indiana: Brown and Benchmark.
Pearson, J.&Spitzberg, B. (1990). Interpersonal Communication: Concepts, Components and Contexts. Dubuque, IA: Brown Brothers

MCJ 102: Concepts of Journalism

Objective:

This introductory course familiarizes the students with the world of journalism by giving them some exposure to its abundance of practices and explaining the conceptual underpinnings.

Description:

It enables them to be well-grounded in understanding the key concepts and the structure, process, functions and implications of journalism. Defining journalism from different perspectives, the course throws light on news, feature, editorial and post-editorial, op-ed page, news writing structure, elements and types of news, interviewing, and pressure on the press. It puts emphasis on newspapers, addressing its roles, responsibilities, management and basic issues of ethics in journalism; it gives a brief view of journalism as practised in television, radio and new media.

Suggested Readings:

Campbell, L. & Wolseley, R. (1961). How to Report and Write the News. Prentice-Hall: USA
Kamath, M. (1980). Professional Journalism. New Delhi:Vikas Publishing House
Bond, F. (1954). An Introduction to Journalism. New York: The Macmillan Company
Harcup, T. (2004). Journalism Principles and Practice. New Delhi: Vistaar Publications
Kunczik, M. (1988). Concepts of Journalism North and South.Bonn: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES)

MCJ 103: Mass Media in Bangladesh

Objective:

The course aims at imparting a basic knowledge of history, growth and performance of the media in Bangladesh. It enables the students to get a view of the media scenario.

Description:

It deals with the emergence, growth and development of newspaper, electronic media, film and the new media. As the history of Bangladeshi media is linked to that of undivided India, the issue will be addressed from the root periodically. Important topics include the historical growth of the media in the context of socio-cultural, political and economic environs, media during Bangladesh War of Liberation and post-independence period. It also discusses media structure, performance and effects of media; profile of media personalities; emerging media and media institutions/ organisations of the country.

Suggested Readings:

Shoesmith, B.&Genilo, J.W. (eds.) (2013).Bangladesh’s Changing Mediascape from State Control to Market Forces. Chicago: University of Chicago Press
পাল, তারাপদ (১৯৭২)। ভারতের সংবাদপত্র।কোলকাতা: সাহিত্য সদন।
ধর, সুব্রত শংকর (১৯৮৫)। বাংলাদেশের সংবাদপত্র। ঢাকা: বাংলা একাডেমী।
সালাম, শেখ আবদুস (২০১১)।বাংলাদেশের গণমাধ্যম ও সাংবাদিকতায় আলোকিতজনেরা। ঢাকা: মাওলা ব্রাদার্স।
আলমগীর, মো. শাহ (সম্পা.) (২০১৬)।বেতার টেলিভিশন সাংবাদিকতা ও প্রাসঙ্গিক ভাবনা। ঢাকা: বাংলাদেশ প্রেস ইনস্টিটিউট।
হায়াৎ, অনুপম (১৯৮৭)। বাংলাদেশের চলচ্চিত্রের ইতিহাস। ঢাকা: বাংলাদেশ চলচ্চিত্র উন্নয়ন কর্পোরেশন।

MCJ 104: Journalistic Writing Skills: Bangla

Objective:

This course helps the students learn how to write Bangla with clarity and effect for general and journalistic purposes.

Description:

There is no fundamental difference between lucid literary writing and good journalistic writing. Basing on this postulate this course is designed to familiarize the students with examples of good Bangla taken from selected literary writings and selected features and news stories taken from newspapers. Students will read the selected texts intensively. Close familiarity with the texts will help them in writing good Bangla. The instructor will evaluate the students’ intensity of involvement in reading the texts.

Students will go through a continuous process of writing in the classroom and at home with regularity and unremitting seriousness. They will write simple, graphic descriptions/narratives of events, people and places, nature and everyday life, simple news stories and features for the newspapers. They will also translate into Bangla some of the features and news published by BBC News, the New York Times and the Guardian to learn more about style.

While discussing the writing exercises of the students, the instructor will throw light on the good styles of writing, some basic rules of effective writing and pay attention to rectifying spelling errors the students may make and discuss the relevant rules of correct spelling and proper use of punctuation.

Suggested Readings:

ঠাকুর,অবনীন্দ্রনাথ (১৩৫৩) পথেবিপথে, কলিকাতা, বিশ্বভারতী
ঘোষ, শঙ্খ (১৪১৪), সামান্য অসামান্য, কলিকাতা, প্যাপিরাস
আহমেদ, হুমায়ুন (১৯৯১), হুমায়ুন আহমেদের শ্রেষ্ঠ গল্প, ঢাকা, অনিন্দ্য প্রকাশন
পত্রিকা থেকে সংকলিত সংবাদ ও ফিচার
মামুদ, হায়াৎ (২০০৫), বাংলা লেখার নিয়মকানুন (৩য় সংস্করণ), ঢাকা: প্রতীক প্রকাশনা সংস্থা
বাংলা একাডেমী, (১৯৯৪), প্রমিত বাংলা বানানের নিয়ম, ঢাকা: বাংলা একাডেমী

Second Semester

MCJ 105: Interpersonal and Group Communication

Objective:

This course introduces the principles and practices of communication in interpersonal, group and organizational settings, explains relevant concepts and theories and gives an insight into the complexity of gender, cultural and global differences in communication.

Description:

Topics of interpersonal communication underscore universals and axioms in interpersonal communication, effectiveness in interpersonal communication, self in interpersonal communication: self awareness, self-disclosure, assertiveness, shyness, communication apprehension, non-verbal and verbal communication, interpersonal relationships: functions, stages, emotions, conflicts. The discussion of group communication includes group structure, development, dynamics, cohesiveness, group-think, leadership, conflict resolution. The course throws light on structure of organizational communication, power, decision making and communication patterns in organizations.

Suggested Readings:

Devito, J. A. (2016). The Interpersonal Communication Book (14th Edition). New York: Pearson Education Ltd.
Galanes, G. J. & Brilhart, J. K. (1999). Communicating in Groups: Applications and Skills (4th Edition). USA: McGraw-Hill College.
Gamble, T. K. & Gamble, M. (2012). Communication Works (11th Edition). USA: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Hargie, O., Saunders, C., & Dickson, D. (1994). Social Skills in Interpersonal Communication (3rd Edition). London: Routledge.
Tolbert, P. C. & Hall, R. H. (2016). Organizations: Structures, Processes and Outcomes (10th Edition). London: Routledge.
Ruben, B. D. & Stewart, L. P. (2006). Communication and Human Behavior (5th Edition). New York: Pearson.
Tubbs, Stewart L. & Moss, Sylvia (1990). Human Communication [New Edition]. McGraw-Hill Inc.

MCJ 106: Mass Communication: Structure and Process

Objective:

This course gives an overview of the nature, scope and functions of mass communication.

Description:

It defines the meanings of mass communication and range of its functions. It discusses media structure and performance, media support system, composition and nature of media audience, process of media effects, barriers to communication, language and meaning, cognitive dissonance. It also throws light on comparative media systems and the communications revolution.

Suggested Readings:

E. Dennis. Everette. –(2002) Understanding Mass Communication (Houghton Miffin Company)
Dominick.Joseph.R–(2010) The Dynamics of Mass communication (10th Edition, The McGraw Hill Education, Private Limited)
Schramm. Wilbur –(1973)-Men, Messages and Media. (New York: Harper and Row)
Ghosh.Subir–(2015, 2nd edition) Mass Communication: An Indian perspective- SahityaSamsad
Griffin. E.M- (2006)- A first look at Communication Theory. (Boston, McGraw Hill Inc.)
Michael W.Gamble and Teri Kwal Gamble-n (1989)- Introduction Mass Communication. McGraw Hill Inc New York.
মুহিউদ্দীন.খালেদ,আসাদুজ্জামান,এ.এস.এম- (২০০২)-যোগাযোগের তত্ত্ব- বিসিডিজেসি
মুহিউদ্দীন.খালেদ,আসাদুজ্জামান,এ.এস.এম- (২০০২)-যোগাযোগের ধারণা- বিসিডিজেসি
হায়দার.শাওন্তী, সামিন.সাইফুল- (২০১৪) গণযোগাযোগ তত্ত্ব ও প্রয়োগ- বাংলাদেশ প্রেসইনস্টিটিউট

MCJ 107: Bangladesh Culture and Heritage

Objective:

This course aims at familiarizing the students with the milestones in the history of Bengal from the ancient period to the end of 19th century. The knowledge of the political, socio-cultural and economic history gained here will enable the students to understand better the course on contemporary history of the country.

Description:

It discusses the origin and development of the Bengalis as a nation, political developments from the medieval period to the 19th century, origin and growth of Bengali language and literature, Renaissance and the social reformations in 19th century. It sheds light on different components of Bengali culture and heritage such as music, theatre, architectural trends, sculptures, folk culture and cultures of indigenous societies. The course will give a brief overview of dress, food, festivals and other forms of culture in different ages.

Suggested Readings:

ইসলাম, সিরাজুল. (সম্পা.) (১৯৯৩)। বাংলাদেশের ইতিহাস (তিন খন্ড)। ঢাকা: এশিয়াটিক সোসাইটি অব বাংলাদেশ।
ওদুদ, কাজী আবদুল (২০১১)। বাংলার জাগরণ। ঢাকা: কথাপ্রকাশ।
মুখোপাধ্যায়, সুভাষ (২০১৪)। বাঙালীর ইতিহাস, সংক্ষেপে ডক্টর নীহার রঞ্জন রায় এর‘বাঙালীর ইতিহাস’(আদিপর্ব)। ঢাকা: মুক্তধারা।
মুরশিদ, গোলাম (২০০৬)। হাজার বছরের বাঙালি সংস্কৃতি। ঢাকা: অবসর।
খান, এস (২০০৬)। বাংলাদেশের লোক ঐতিহ্য (১ম খ-)। ঢাকা: বাংলাএকাডেমি।
খান, এস. (২০০৮)। বাংলাদেশের লোক ঐতিহ্য (২য় খ-)। ঢাকা: বাংলাএকাডেমি।
হালদার, গোপাল (২০০৫)। বাংলা সাহিত্যের রূপরেখা (অখ-) । ঢাকা: শুভপ্রকাশ।
হুমায়ুন, আজাদ (২০১৫)। লাল নীল দীপাবলি বা বাংলা সাহিত্যের জীবনী। ঢাকা: আগামী প্রকাশনী।
হুমায়ুন, আজাদ (১৯৯২)। কতো নদী সরোবর বা বাঙলা ভাষার জীবনী। ঢাকা: আগামী প্রকাশনী।

MCJ 108: Journalistic Writing Skills: English

Objective:

The purpose of this course is to help students improve their skills in writing a given topic in simple, clear and concise English. They will find their exercises and participation useful in identifying their weaknesses, writing correctly and thinking logically.

Description:

It is primarily designed to help students improve communication skills, especially writing and reading. They will learn and appreciate a range of styles and forms of expressions through prediction, inference, summarizing, and analyzing academic and beyond academic contexts with emphasis on journalistic view point. The course lays particular emphasis on writing process, paragraph structure, patterns of paragraph, paragraph development by narration, description, listing or examples, comparison or contrast, definition, classification, cause and effect and problem solution, practicing grammar and building vocabulary based on the students’ need assessment. It throws light on writing simple features and letters to the editor. Students will be encouraged to think and write with confidence in ways that reflect their individual perspective an identity.

Suggested Readings:

Langan, J. (2001) English Skills (7th edition). USA: Mc Graw Hill. Imhoof, M. & Hudson, H. (2013). From Paragraph to Essay (5th edition). Hong Kong: Longman.
Brown, K. & Susan, H.(2001). Writing Matters (10th edition). UK: Cambridge University Press.
Greenberg, K.L., & Wiener, H.(1994). The Advancing Writer, Book-2. USA: Harper Collins College Publishers.
Berry, T.E. (1976). Common Mistakes in English Usage (1st Edition). India: Mc Graw Hill.
Fitikides,T.J.(1963).Common mistakes in English (5th edition). UK: Longman.
Raman, M. S. S. (2004). Technical Communication (1st Edition). India: Oxford University Press.
Rich, S. (1995). The Flexible Writer (2nd edition). USA: Allyn and Bacon.
Fox, W. (2003). Writing the news (3rd edition). India: Surjeet Publications.
Helen, M. (1956). Writing and Selling Feature Articles. (3rd edition). USA: Prentice-Hall.

Third Semester

MCJ 201: News Gathering and Writing

Objective:

This course introduces the techniques of news gathering and writing for news media, with an emphasis on the techniques used in current print media journalism.

Description:

Highlighting the importance of news gathering, it discusses the techniques of writing news, arranging news structure, writing different types of intro. The students will learn how to report accident, public speech, death and simple social and cultural events. The course helps the students identify the key points of news and the sources, how to get background information and how to develop resources to make the coverage balanced and effective.

Suggested Readings:

Warren, C. (1934). Modern news reporting. USA: Harper and Brothers
Clayton, C.C (1947). News Reporting Today. USA: The Odyssey Press
Mencher, M. (2007). Basic News Writing. New York: McGraw-Hill Education
Kovach, B. & Rosenstiel, T. (2007). The Elements of Journalism. New York: Three Rivers Press

MCJ 202: ICT Skills

Objective:

This course aims to give the students a good grounding in necessary computer skills, internet uses and uses of mobile phone for journalism.

Description:

The course gives hands-on experience in certain computer skills like office programs (Word, Excel, Power Point, Access) and graphics. Students will get familiar with computer terminologies and brief history of computer from socio-cultural perspective.

Internet and mobile experience have become integral part of journalism in contemporary world. This course pays particular attention to how the students can build internet and mobile phone experience more effectively. They are familiarized with the various uses of internet with specific purposes. They will learn the basics of mobile photography and video, which is of considerable use in the making of mojos.

Suggested Readings:

Price, M.A. (2011). Computer Basics in Easy. London: Easy Steps Limited
Stephen, M. (2004). Teach Yourself Basic Computer Skills. New York: McGraw-Hill
Parsons, J.J., & Oja, D. (2011). Practical Computer Literacy (3rd edition). USA: MediaTechnics Corporation.
Bruzzone, L. (2015). Smartphones and Technological Convergence
ইসলাম, মোহাম্মদ শহীদুল (২০০৪). মৌলিক কম্পিউটার. ঢাকা: বাংলাএকাডেমী
সরকার, মো. আব্দুলমান্নান (১৯৯৫). কম্পিউটার এনাটমি. বগুড়া: জাতীয়বহুভাষী সাঁটলিপি প্রশিক্ষণ ও গবেষণা একাডেমী
ইসলাম, মোহাম্মদ শহীদুল (২০১৩). ব্যবহারিক কম্পিউটার শব্দকোষ. ঢাকা: বাংলাএকাডেমী

MCJ 203: Social Processes and Institutions

Objective:

The course gives a critical view of the role of specific social and cultural forces in changing and shaping existing social structure and circumstances.

Description:

It makes an analysis of the interplay among social institutions, culture and individuals by drawing on various perspectives and major theories of sociology. Students are instructed to critically examine contemporary social changes and underlying causes of social problems. A wide range of topics in the course includes family, social class, race and religion, gender, social inequality, power differentials, social movements, and other social phenomena. The course discusses different approaches to studying the impact of social processes on our lives.

Suggested Readings:

Dillon, M. (2014). Introduction to Sociological Theory: Theorists, Concepts, and their Applicability to the Twenty-First Century. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell
Ritzer, G. (2014). The McDonaldization of Society. London: SAGE Publications
Newman, D.M. (2013). Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday life. London: Sage Publications
Anthony Giddens et al. (2013). Introduction to Sociology.USA: W. W. Norton & Company
Kivisto, P. (2012). Social Theory: Roots and Branches. UK: Oxford University Press
Morrison, K. (1995). Marx, Durkheim, Weber: Formations of Modern Social Thought. London: Sage Publications

MCJ 204: Contemporary Bangladesh Affairs

Objective:

The course introduces the students to the major socio-cultural and political and economic developments of Bangladesh from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present.

Description:

It discusses the emergence of Bangladesh as an independent country and its evolving political reality, economics and socio-cultural aspects. To give a background it throws light on the development of movements against British rule from the early phase of the twentieth century, creation of Pakistan, growth of the sense of Bengali nationality through language movement, cultural movements and movements in more concrete political forms such as Six-point Programme, Eleven Points Programmes, mass upsurge in 1969, general election of 1970, the Liberation War and independence in 1971. The course discusses a wide range of post-independence issues highlighting the Constitution and its amendments, assassination of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, jail killing, rise of military rule and anti-military movements, concept of caretaker government, present state of democracy, economic growth and social advancement.

Suggested Readings:

Barua, T.K. (1978). Political Elite in Bangladesh: A Socio-Anthropological and Historical Analysis of the Processes of their Formation. Bern: Peter Lang.
Jahan, R. (ed.) (2002). Bangladesh Promise and Performance. Dhaka: The University Press Limited (UPL).
Sen, R. (1986). Political Elites in Bangladesh. Dhaka: The University Press Limited (UPL).
আহমদ, এ. এম. (১৯৭০)।আমার দেখা রাজনীতির পঞ্চাশ বছর।ঢাকা: নওরোজ কিতাবিস্তান।
ইসলাম, এস. (সম্পা.) (১৯৯৩)। বাংলাদেশের ইতিহাস (তিন খন্ড)। ঢাকা: এশিয়াটিক সোসাইটি অব বাংলাদেশ।
ইসলাম, আর (২০০৪)। বাংলাদেশের স্বাধীনতা সংগ্রাম। ঢাকা: ঐতিহ্য।
চৌধুরী, এস. আই. (২০১১)। বাঙালীর জাতীয়তাবাদ (পরিবর্ধিত তৃতীয় সংস্করণ)। ঢাকা: দি ইউনিভার্সিটি প্রেস লিমিটেড।
হান্নান, এম (২০০০)। বাংলাদেশের ছাত্র আন্দোলনের ইতিহাস। ঢাকা: আগামী প্রকাশনী।

Fourth Semester

MCJ 205: Introduction to Editing

Objective:

The course is designed to help the students develop the basic editing techniques to make a news copy more readable and capable of holding readers’ interest.

Description:

It is concerned with editing skills that are required for working in the newspaper. The focus will be on copy editing, rewriting, headline writing, simple page make-up of a newspaper and translation. The course is a good combination of the concepts of news editing technique and practice.

Suggested Readings:

Brown, H.C. (1970) News Editing and Display, New York: Harper and Row
Newsom D and Wollert, J A (1985)- News for the Mass Media: Media Writing, NewYork: Wadsworth Publishing Company
রায়,সুধাংশু শেখর (২০০৩) সাংবাদিকতা সাংবাদিক ও সংবাদপত্র, ঢাকা: ম্যাসলাইন মিডিয়া সেন্টার
খন্দকার,রফিকুল ইসলাম (২০১৪) খবর লেখা ও সম্পাদনা,ঢাকা: বাংলাদেশ প্রেস ইনস্টিটিউট
আশরাফ,খন্দকার আলী (২০০৩)-সংবাদ সম্পাদনা, ঢাকা: বাংলাদেশ প্রেস ইনস্টিটিউট

MCJ 206: Mass Communication Theories

Objective:

The course aims to provide the students a thorough and in-depth knowledge about the theoretical foundation of mass media and communication. It discusses a wide range of theories, models, and theoretical perspectives related to mass media.

Description:

The course lays emphasis on the theories of media and society, media structure and performance, media content, audience and effect. A wide range of topics include information theory, theory of uses and gratifications, theories of power and social change relating to the media, agenda setting. The course sheds light on violence and erotica, basics of semiotics, cultural and alternative viewpoints, uses and implications of new media.

Suggested Readings:

Baran, S & Davis, D. (2003). Mass Communication Theory: Foundations, Ferment, and Future. Belmont: Thomson-Wadsworth.
McQuail, D. (2000). Mass Communication Theory: An Introduction. London: Sage Publications.
Severin, W. & Tankard, J. (1988). Communication Theories: Origins, Methods and Uses. New York: Longman.
DeFleur, M.L. & Ball-Rokeach, S. (1988). Theories of Mass Communication. New York: Longman.
Griffin, E. (2009). A First Look at Communication Theory. New York: McGraw Hill.

MCJ 207: Political Processes and Institutions

Objective:

This course aims to examine the nature of politics and political institutions in perspective of key political theories and comparative politics. It extricates the intricacies of the processes and institutions and sheds light on the consequence of politics in contemporary society.

Description:

The course relates the thoughts of political thinkers from Plato to Marx to the explication of political realities, processes and institutions. It enables the students to comprehend and critically assess the ways in which political culture, democracy and electoral process, authoritarian regimes, political party, government, bureaucracies, political participation, political socialization, social movements, and public policies are operative. The course discusses the influences of political art, music, film, political content in the media, advertisement on politicization.

Suggested Readings:

Caramani, D. (2011). Comparative Politics. UK: Oxford University Press
Jha, S. (2010). Western Political Thought: From Plato to Marx. London: Pearson
McNally, M. & Schwarzmantel, J. (eds.) (2009). Gramsci and Global Politics: Hegemony and Resistance. London: Routledge
Hague, R. & Harrop, M. (2007). Comparative Government and Politics: An Introduction USA: Palgrave Macmillan
Gaus, G.F. & Kukathas, C. (eds.) (2004). Handbook of Political Theory. London: Sage Publications

MCJ 208: Contemporary World Affairs

Objective:

The course aims to investigate the nature of global conflicts, low intensity wars and a wide range of issues with varied parameters in the contemporary world.

Description:

It sheds light on the scale of global change in terms of crisis, conflict, cooperation and conformity from the early phase of the 20th century. It discusses the world wars, revolutions and the period between the world wars with an emphasis on the great depression, rise of fascism and Nazism, spread of communism, near-breakdown of capitalism, end of old empires and growth of neo-imperialism. It examines rivalry between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. in the cold war, peaceful coexistence and dismemberment of the USSR. It looks critically at the increase in mass unemployment, cyclical slumps, growing economic inequality from mid-1970s to the present. Some of the major conflicts like the Vietnam War, war and turmoil in the Middle East, wars in former Yugoslavia, wars in Afghanistan and war on terrorism come under the purview of the course. It takes into account scientific advances and the state of arts and reviews the significant current events covered by the media.

Suggested Readings:

Grenville J.A.S, A History of the World from the 20th to the 21st century, Abingdon Oxon Routeledge, 2005
Tignor Robert et al, World Together and World Apart Vol II, New York W.W.Norton and Company, 2011
Hobsbawm Eric, The Age of Extremes, London Abacas, 1995
The New York Times, The Guardian, The Nation, New Statesman and other dailies and weeklies.

Fifth Semester

MCJ 301: Newspaper Reporting

Objective:

The objective of the course is to familiarize the students, who have been introduced to the basic rules of news gathering and writing in a 200-level course, with more mature ways of news gathering and writing for newspaper.

Description:

It is designed to stimulate the investigative and interpretative bent of mind of the students in gathering and writing news. In addition to writing news regularly on a variety of issues, the students will read good reports selected from Bengali newspapers, the Washington post, the New York Times, the Independent (UK) and the Guardian. Particular emphasis will be laid on writing news related to politics, different issues and debates in development, complex socio-cultural issues. The instructor critically discusses the students’ reporting exercises and makes an evaluation of their reading of selected news stories.

Suggested Readings:

Warren, C. (1934). Modern news reporting. USA: Harper and Brothers
Campbell, L.R. & Wolseley, R.E. (1961). How to report and write the news. New Jersey: Prentice Hall
Dary, D. (1973). How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media. PA, USA: GL Tab Books
Harriss, J., Leiter, K. & Johnson, S. (1985). The Complete Reporter. London: Macmillan Pub Co.
Rivers, W.L. (1964). The Mass Media: Reporting, Writing, Editing. New York: Harper and Row
Mencher, M. (2007). Basic News Writing. New York: McGraw-Hill Education

MCJ 302: Media Laws and Ethics

Objective:

The course introduces the students to the legal and ethical issues in relation to the media industry.

Description:

It reviews the press freedom and press influence, responsibility of press, factors that affect the functioning of journalism such as truth, lies, manipulation, temptation, bias, fairness. It discusses the laws related to the mass media in Bangladesh. A wide range of topics include defamation, decency and morality, contempt of court, parliament, copyright, media employees, official secrecy, press council, censorship, declaration and registration etc. It also discusses fundamental human rights, the constitution of Bangladesh and its amendments.

Suggested Readings:

Moore, R.L. (1999). Mass Communication Law and Ethics. London: Routledge.
Hoque, A.N.M.G. (1992). Mass Media Laws and Regulations in Bangladesh. Singapore: AMIC.
Rahman, G.S. (1985). Laws Relating to the Press in Bangladesh. Dhaka: Jatiyo Mudran.
Akhtaruzzaman, M. (2012). Freedom of the Press in South Asia. Dhaka: DIU Publisher
Ahmed, M. A. (2009). Media Regulations, Political Culture and Reform in Bangladesh, Canadian Journal of Media Studies, UWO Volume.

MCJ 303: Economic Processes and Institutions

Objective:

The course is designed to give the students a good understanding of the fundamental economic concepts and the process of economic activity in various institutions of the society.

Description:

Throwing brief light on some basic concepts of economics, it discusses forms of market, national income, money, banking, investment, budgetary action, export and import, economic growth, inflation, employment, wealth and income distribution. It sheds brief light on development perspectives; it reviews the part played by manufactures, traders and consumers in the national economy, the pervasiveness of multinational corporations and the role of international financial institutions.

Suggested Readings:

Samuelson, Paul and Nordhaus, W. D, (2009) Economics, New York: McGraw-Hill
Krugman, P., Wells, R., and Graddy, K. (2010), Essentials of Economics, New York: Worth Publishers.
Stiglitz, J.E. and Walsh, C.E. (20060), Economics, New York: W.W.Norton & Company.
মুহাম্মদ, আনু (২০১০)। অর্থশাস্ত্র পরিচয় । ঢাকা: সংহতি প্রকাশনী
আকাশ, এস, এম,(২০০৪)। বাংলাদেশের অর্থনীতিঃ অতীত, বর্তমান ও ভবিষ্যৎ। ঢাকা: প্যাপিরাস প্রকাশনী

MCJ 304: Communication Research Methodology

Objective:

The course aims to help students develop skills in gathering, organizing, interpreting and presenting research information on media and communication using different methods.

Description:

It gives an overview of the concepts, methods, and tools, by which communication research is designed, conducted and recorded. It enables the students to identify and avoid errors in enquiry, select research topic and define concepts/terms used in a research project, design research plans, formulate research questions and hypotheses and review literature. Topics include survey method, content analysis, focus group discussion, experimental method, ethnographic/field research. Students are instructed in making an effective research proposal.

Suggested Readings:

Priest, S.H. (2009). Doing Media Research: An Introduction (2nd edition). London: Sage Publications, Inc.
Babbie, E. (2009). The Practice of Social Research (12th edition). MA, USA: Cengage Learning.
Leedy, P.D. & Ormrod, J.E. (2015). Practical Research (11th edition). New York: Pearson Education, Limited.
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (Sixth Edition). Washington, DC: Author
Poindexter, P. M., & McCombs, M. E. (2000). Research in Mass Communication: A Practical Guide. Bedford: St. Martin’s.

Sixth Semester

MCJ 305: Media, Society and Culture

Objective:

The course intends to explore the interplay between media, society and culture and analyze critically the role of media in society - cultural change and social behaviour.

Description:

It examines the connectedness of media with culture and society, throwing light on effects studies, political economy of communication and cultural studies. It investigates pattern of media ownership, media manipulation of consent, role of the media in the social construction of reality, impact of media-disseminated messages on individuals. It pays particular attention to the knotty issue of how the media shape contemporary ideology and culture and look at the ways in which human identity is increasingly influenced by media representations. These issues will be addressed mainly from the perspectives of Adorno and Horkheirmer’s Culture Industry, Herman and Chomsky’s propaganda model, Benjamin’s analysis of art in the age of mechanical reproduction, Mosco’s political economy perspective, During’s discussion of culture and McChesney’s analysis of media and globalization.

The discussion will lead to the Bangladesh context with a view to relating the theoretical perspectives to local realities.

Suggested Readings:

Gurevitch, M., Bennett, T., Curran, J. & Woollacott, J. (eds.) (1982). Culture, Society and the Media. London: Methuen.
Mosco, V. (1996). The Political Economy of Communication. London: Sage.
During, S. (1999). The Cultural Studies Reader. London: Routledge.
Hall, S. (1997). Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practice. London: Sage Publications.
Herman, E.S. & Chomsky, N. (2002). Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of Mass Media. New York: Pantheon
ফাহমিদুল হক (২০১১)। অসম্মতি উৎপাদন। ঢাকা: সংহতি।
ফাহমিদুল হক ও আ-আল মামুন (সম্পা., ২০১৩)। মিডিয়া সমাজ সংস্কৃতি। ঢাকা: আগামী।

MCJ 306: Statistics in Communication Research

Objective:

The course is designed to give the students a good grounding in statistics required for doing communication/social research.

Description:

It attempts to explain measures of central tendency and variability in statistical data; principles of sampling and probability; hypothesis testing; strength of association between variables; computing and interpreting regression equations. The course enables the students to acquire competence in using statistical software in data analysis.

Suggested Readings:

Tripathi, P. C. (2002).A textbook of Research methodology in Social Sciences. New Delhi: Sultan Chand
Levin, J. & Fox, J. A. (2007).Elementary statistics in social research: The Essentials (2nd Edition). Boston: Pearson
Miller, E.L. (1986).Basic statistics: A conceptual approach for beginners. IN, USA: Accelerated Development Muncie

MCJ 307: International Communication

Objective:

The course attempts to define the key concepts and theories of international communication and give a broad understanding of the cultural, social, political and economic bases of communications in global context.

Course description:

It enables the students to identify and critically analyze issues and trends in international communication from theoretical perspectives. Students of this course develop an insight into various issues in this field by studying evolution, channels, processes, dimensions, and politics of international communication. They understand various implications of global media by analyzing the relationship between globalization and media. The course seeks answers to some cardinal questions: Why is the flow of global news and information extremely one way? Who controls the flow of information and news in a global context? What is cultural or media imperialism? It discusses critically the use of empowering technologies of Internet, satellite television, and digital video by different groups, governments, and individuals, role and impact of media in international relations with an emphasis on war and peace and ethical issues in international communication.

Suggested Readings:

Thussu, D.K. (ed.) (2010). International Communication: A Reader. New York: Routledge Frederick, H.H. (1992). Global Communication and International Relations. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Press
McPhail, T.L. (2006). Global Communication: Theories, Stakeholders, and Trends(Second edition). London: Blackwell Publishing
Hamelink, C. (2014). Global Communication. London: Sage
Pednekar-Magal, V. (ed.) (2014).International Communication: Essential Readings (second edition). CA, USA: Cognella Academic Publishing

MCJ 308: Editing and Publishing

Objective:

This course is designed to help students sharpen their editing skills learnt in an introductory course and raise them to a higher level.

Description:

Students in this course go for continuous practices of writing/preparing news stories in different forms and emphases. They will be able to understand the preparation of schedule, layout and page make up of a national daily. They learn the more advanced forms of page makeup using different methods. They are given hands-on experience in the production and publication of newspapers. Topics include techniques of editing complex stories; layout and page make up; grading and beautification process of newspapers; process of printing system; comparative analysis of news of different newspapers.

Suggested Readings:

Herbert, J. (2000). Journalism in the Digital Age. MA, USA: Focal Press
Moen, D. (2000). Newspaper Layout and Design (4th edition). IA, USA: Iowa State University Press
Islam, M. (2016). A Manual of Style and Standards in Academic Writing, Editing and Publishing. Singapore: Partridge

Seventh Semester

MCJ 401: Communication and Information Technologies

Objective:

The course intends to familiarize the students with the wide range of communication and information technologies.

Description:

It focuses on the foundations of modern information technologies including the new media, throwing some light on the history of the technologies. It discusses the technological structures and functions of the following technologies: computer hardware and software, internet, wireless technology and mobile phone, and satellite. The varied aspects of social media and issues like privacy, obscenity, security, digital divide, gender and ICT, political economy of new media, civil movement and new media, and internet governance are included in the scope of this course.

Suggested Readings:

Mirabito, Michael M.A. (2004). The Communication Technologies: Applications, Policy and Impact (5th ed.). Burlington: Focal Press.
Martin Lister et al (2009). New Media: A Critical Introduction (2nd edn.). London: Routledge.
Fuchs, Christian (2014). Social Media: A Critical Introduction. London: Sage Publications Ltd.
Castells, Manuel & Cardoso (eds.) (2005). Network Society: From Knowledge to Policy. Massachusetts: The Johns Hopkins University

MCJ 402: Gender and Communication

Objective:

This course aims to explore the relationship between communication and gender and create in the students a keen awareness of gender-sensitive communication.

Description:

It explains the basic concepts of gender studies, including patriarchy, feminism(s) and the formation of gender identities and roles. It focuses on the gendered nature of communication in various contexts, such as, family and social relationships, educational and professional environments, print and electronic media. It looks at gender in the context of the rapid growth of technology. The gender stereotypes at all levels of communication and culture are discussed with a view to highlighting the necessity of a comprehensive gender sensitive media policy.

Suggested Readings:

DeFrancisco, V. L., Palczewski, C. H., & McGeough, D. D. (2013). Gender in communication: A critical introduction (2nd ed.). London: SAGE Publications.
Kearney, M. C. (2012). The gender and media reader. New York: Routledge.
Nelson, A., & Brown, C. D. (2012). The Gender Communication Handbook: Conquering Conversational Collisions between Men and Women. New Jersey: Wiley.
Gallagher, M. (1981). Unequal Opportunities: the case of women and the media. Paris: UNESCO.
Bhasin, K . (2000). Understanding Gender. New Delhi: Kali For Women.
Lips, M. H. (1993). Sex and Gender: An Introduction. California: Mayfield Publishing.
ফেরদৌস, রহমান , চৌধুরী .(২০১০). জেন্ডার যোগাযোগ . ঢাকা: বাঙলায়ন
শারমিন, ফেরদৌস. (২০০১). বাংলাদেশের সংবাদপত্রে জেন্ডার সংবেদনশীলতা. ঢাকা: প্লাজ

MCJ 403: Broadcast Journalism

Objective:

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the techniques of reporting and writing for television and radio.

Description:

It focuses on the unique nature of picture, footage and sound, special skills, knowledge and background that the students need to learn the craft of broadcast reporting. It covers different forms of broadcast news, finding gathering and capturing news. Topics include sourcing stories, reporting with sound, good interviewing, technique, writing broadcast copies, audio and video storytelling and feature making, ethics and law of broadcast journalism. The course lays emphasis on preparing broadcast bulletins, news presentation and visiting television and radio stations.

Suggested Readings:

Mayeux, E.P. (1991).Broadcast News: Writing and Reporting. USA: Brown and Benchmark.
Warren, C. (1934).Modern News Reporting. USA: Harper and brothers.
Mencher, M. (2008). News Reporting and Writing. 11th edition.USA:Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
মেহেদী, সুজন। (২০১১)। টিভি রিপোর্টিং।ঢাকা: ঐতিহ্য প্রকাশনী।
আল-আমিন, শামীম। (২০১৩)। টেলিভিশন সংবাদ উপস্থাপনা। ঢাকা: অনুপম প্রকাশনী।
Bhatt, C.S. (2010).Broadcast Journalism: Basic Principles. India: Haranand Publications.
Hyde. S. W. (2015).Television and Radio Announcing. 12th edition. USA: Forgotten Publishers.
Cohler, K. D. (1994). Broadcast Journalism. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

MCJ 404: Development Communication

Objective:

This course is intended to provide the students with an informed understanding of the processes and methods through which different types of communication and media production influence economic, social, political and cultural development in a society.

Description:

It discusses the misconceptions of the nature of development, distinction between development and underdevelopment, essential features of development, issues of inequality and poverty, and influences of communication policies and strategies on the process of development. By drawing on theoretical and methodological perspectives it discusses the prospects and limitations of development-related communication approaches and the critical views on media’s role in reinforcement/removal of inequality.

Suggested Readings:

Melkote, S.R. & Steeves, H.L. (2015). Communication for Development: Theory and Practice for Empowerment and Social Justice. New Delhi: Sage Publications
McAnany, E.G. (2012). Saving the World: A Brief History of Communication for Development and Social Change. IL, USA: University of Illinois Press
Manyozo, L. (2012). Media, Communication and Development: Three Approaches. London: Sage Publications
McPhail, T.L. (ed.) (2009). Development Communication: Reframing the Role of the Media. NY: Wiley- Blackwell
Mody, B. (ed.) (2003). International and Development Communication: A 21st-Century Perspective. New Delhi: Sage Publications

Eighth Semester

Students choose two courses from MCJ 405 through MCJ 414. MCJ 405 and MCJ 406 are mutually exclusive. They will have to take either MCJ 415: Research or MCJ 416: Internship mandatorily. MCJ 417 (Comprehensive and Oral) is also obligatory for all students. This is how they take four courses in total. The distribution of marks for Comprehensive and Oral examinations is 50 and 15 respectively.

MCJ 405: Video Production

Objective:

This course, designed for students with little or no background in video production, attempts to help them develop their creativity and technical expertise, which may be used for working in a broadcast media.

Description:

It familiarizes the students with the role and technical characteristics of video technologies, production process, script writing, news gathering, lighting, sound, editing (aesthetic and technical perspectives) etc. Topics include development of video, camera controls, camera facilities, video production, production approaches, choosing microphones, functions of microphones, aims of lighting, basic lighting approaches, editing principles, aims of makeup. The topics are discussed at both theoretical and practical levels.

Suggested Readings:

Millerson, G. (1993). Effective TV Production. New York: Focal Press,
Zettl, H. (2015). Television Production Hand Book (12th edition). Wadsworth Publishing
Hanson, J. (1987). Understanding Video. London: Sage Publications,
Kindem, G. (1987). The Moving Image. Scott, Foresman
Millerson, G. (2001). Video Production Hand Book (3rd edition). New York: Focal Press
Wurtzel, A. & Acker, S.R. (1990). Television Production. New York: McGraw-Hill Education

MCJ 406: Photo Journalism

Objective:

This course focuses on building the fundamental skills needed to produce images for publication.

Description:

It helps the students learn the techniques of press photography to be visual storytellers. Emphasis is laid on the practical and theoretical aspects of photography, overview of history of press photography, and the broad nature and scope of photo journalism. Students learn about camera configuration, techniques of composition, sharpness, focusing techniques, lighting techniques, caption writing and extending photo journalism to social experiences. They also become familiar with the properties and techniques of digital and analog photography.

Suggested Readings:

Hoy, F. P. (1986). Photojournalism: The Visual Approach. Prentice-Hall.
Kobre, K. (2008). Photojournalism: The Professionals’ Approach (6th edition). New York: Focal Press.
Nieman Reports. (2010). Visual Journalism: Fresh Approaches and New Business Strategies for the Multimedia Age, The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University.
ইসলাম, মো: রফিকুল (১৯৯৯)। ফটোগ্রাফি: কলাকৌশল ও মনন। ঢাকা: প্রিজম প্রকাশনী।
রহমান, পাভেল (২০১৬)। সাংবাদিকতা: আমার ক্যামেরায়। ঢাকা: মাওলা ব্রাদার্স।

MCJ 407: Economic and Business Journalism

Objective:

The course is designed to help the students learn the techniques and methods of business and economic reporting.

Description:

It covers news and features, articles about people, places and issues of business organizations. Students learn how to report about a wide variety of issues, such as, budget, stock market, stock exchange, bond market, major business and industrial issues, SME issues, monetary and fiscal policy, businesspersons and consumers.

Suggested Readings:

Hayes, K. (2013). Business Journalism: How to report on Business and Economics
Thompson, T. (2000). Writing About Business: The New Columbia Knight-Bagehot Guide to Economics and Business Journalism. New York
অজয় দাশগুপ্ত ও রোবায়েত ফেরদৌস (সম্পাদিত) (২০১০). ব্যবসায় সাংবাদিকতা. ঢাকা: শ্রাবণ প্রাকাশনী।

MCJ 408: Graphic Communication

Objective:

The course gives a conceptual understanding of graphic communication and lets the students learn about different forms of graphic communication and their effective use in media.

Description:

It covers the theoretical aspects of graphic communication and influences of visual communication on audience. Topics include evolution of graphic communication, verbal and visual elements of communication and design and production of graphic communication, graphic design technology used in traditional and new media. It discusses the difference of type, image and three-dimensional graphics, copywriting for graphic communication, graphical representation of data and its use. Students are expected to participate in a term project on designing effective graphic communication material.

Suggested Readings:

Lester, P. M. (2013). Visual communication: Images with messages (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.
Ryan, W. E., & Conover, T. E. (2004). Graphic communications today. Clifton Park, NY: Thomson/Delmar Learning.
Shaughnessy, A. (2009). Graphic design: A user's manual. London, U.K.: Laurence King.

MCJ 409: Online Journalism

Objective:

The objective of this course is to provide the students an idea of the nature and process of journalism in the cyber environment.

Description:

It briefly introduces the fundamentals of cyberspace and its culture. Topics include the nature, advantages and disadvantages of online journalism, difference between traditional print journalism and online journalism, advertising on the web, circulation of web newspapers, citizen journalism and future of web journalism. The course throws light on both global and Bangladesh contexts. It lays emphasis on practices using online platforms, writing news stories, features and articles on the web, presentation and layout of web newspapers and magazines.

Suggested Readings:

Lister, Martin et al. (2009). New Media: A Critical Introduction (2nd ed.). Routledge: London.
Siapera, E. & Veglis, A. (eds.) (2012). The Handbook of Global Online Journalism. West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.
Ward, M. (2002). Journalism Online. Oxford: Focal Press.
Pavlik, J. V. (2001). Journalism and New Media.
Saxena, S. (2004). Breaking News: The Craft and Technology of Online Journalism. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.
Hall, J. (2001). Online Journalism: A Critical Primer. London: Pluto Press.
Gilmore, D. (2004). We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People. Sebastopol: O’Reilly Media.

MCJ 410: Public Speaking and Broadcast Presentation

Objective:

The course is designed to help the students learn the techniques of preparing and delivering speeches. It helps them in sharpening their critical thinking, strengthening general communication skills and building specific speaking skills.

Description:

This course gives instruction in preparing and delivering speeches within a group discussion and public setting. The topics include overview of a speech, types of speeches, the effective coordination between verbal and non-verbal communication, audience analysis, speech content and its organisation and effective delivery. Students prepare and deliver speeches on a variety of issues as part of practical exercises. They also give close reading of selected great speeches and try to study the art of speaking by listening to the speeches. This course familiarizes the students with certain presentation techniques for broadcast media.

Suggested Readings:

Lucas Stephen, (2009) The Art of Public Speaking, New York: McGraw-Hill
Prentice, D. & Payne, J. (1994). Public Speaking Today. : National Textbook Company
Hyde, S. (1987). Television and Radio Announcing.
Cohler, D. K. (1994). Broadcast Journalism: A Guide for the Presentation of Radio and Television News. New Jersey: Allyn & Bacon, Inc

MCJ 411: Feature, Editorial and Op-Ed Writing

Objective:

This course is designed as a practical course for writing features, articles, editorials and opinions for different media, particularly the newspaper.

Description:

It attempts to present two types of writing: one is writing in the form of story-telling in a narrative style, the other is writing in a relatively serious manner. The first kind focuses on the importance of interviews in feature writing, learning the art of adapting the tone of writing to different categories of subject matter, using apt introductions to play up a strong news angle or maximise a story's human interest. Feature writing explores eyewitness and offbeat approaches. This second kind focuses on effective editorial/opinion writing. It is intended to help students in writing clear, stylish and logically sound editorials, columns and op-eds. Emphasis is laid on the role of opinion writing, gaining credibility through careful writing and developing a style. Besides regular writing exercises, the students will read selected significant features, editorials and op-ed writings. The course instructor will make an evaluation of the depth of their reading.

Suggested Readings:

Hutchinson, E. R. (2007). The Art of Feature Writing: From Newspaper Features and Magazine Articles to Commentary. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Blundell, W. B. (1988). The Art and Craft of Feature Writing. New York: Plume.
Standring, S. M. (2013). The Art Opinion Writing. RRP International LLC.

MCJ 412: Magazine Editing and Production

Objective:

This course aims to familiarize the students with the essentials of magazine editing and production.

Description:

It describes how to conceptualize a magazine; plan issues and work with writers; check an article’s fit and tone, structure, lead and conclusion; check facts and grammar; consider the ethical issues. It relates the process of producing a magazine; provides a behind-the-scenes look at the making of well-known magazines; analyzes the future of magazines in a digital environment and ongoing importance of magazine journalism. The course gives a brief overview of the magazines in Bangladesh from a socio-cultural perspective.

Suggested Readings:

Evans, M. R. (2004). The Layers of Magazine Editing. Columbia University Press.
Navasky , V. S. & Cornog , E. (Ed.) (2012). The Art of Making Magazine. Columbia University Press.
Hannett, J. (2010). Bibliopegia: Or the Art of Bookbinding, in All Its Branches. Cambridge Library Collection: Printing and Publishing History (2nd ed.). Cambridge University Press.

MCJ 413: Business Communication and Corporate Social Responsibility

Objective:

The course aims to explain the process of effective communication in business, connections and contradictions between business and social good and social responsibility of the corporate world.

Description:

It focuses on various issues of business communication and covers a wide range of topics, such as, concepts and principles of business communication, barriers to business communication, essentials of good business communication and building blocks for effective business communication. It discusses strategic corporate communication, listening in business, body sports, creating goodwill, good writing, presentation, group discussion, interview, time management, working in a team, conflict handling, report and proposal writing, tele working. It also throws light on business sustainability and CSR and overall effects of CSR on business and society.

Suggested Readings:

kitty O, L. & Kaczmarek, S.K.T. (2011). Business Communication (3rd Edition). New Delhi: McGraw Hill Education Private Limited.
David, N. & Butterworth, S.S. (1996). Business Communications. Oxford: Butterworth-Henemann.
Du, S., Bhattacharya, C. B., & Sen, S. (2010). “Maximizing Business Returns to
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): The Role of CSR Communication”. International Journal of Management Reviews, 12(1), 8‐19.doi: 10.1111/j.1468‐2370.2009.00276.x
Carroll, A. B. (1998). “The Four Faces of Corporate Citizenship”. Business and Society Review, 100(1), 1‐7. doi: 10.1111/0045‐3609.00008
Carroll, A. B. (1999). “Corporate Social Responsibility”. Business & Society, 38(3), 268‐295.doi: 10.1177/000765039903800303
সালাম, শেখ আবদুস ও মেহতাজ, অবন্তী (২০১৪). বিজনেস কম্যুনিকেশন. ঢাকা: অবসর প্রকাশনী সংস্থা

MCJ 414: Development Support and Strategic Communication

Objective:

The course is designed to make the students perceive how development initiatives, projects and programs may resonate by an integration of development support communication with strategic communication.

Description:

It gives an overview of the concepts of Development Support Communication (DSC), its origin, features and emerging trends. It attempts to elucidate the process of communicating organization policy strategically and understand the actors that drive communication in the public sphere and modulate public perception. Both DSC and strategic communication aim at reaching the benefits of development to the broader sections of the people; therefore the combination of the two is expected to contribute to the dynamism and of communication and eventually to socio-economic amelioration.

The course discusses the planning of DSC campaign with a focus on the advantages of campaign, creating the plan, techniques of campaign, selecting media and method, prospects and challenges of DSC in Bangladesh. In order to relate the discussion to strategic communication the course throws light on the context of strategic communication, theories of strategic communication, strategic planning, messaging strategies, implementing plans, issue and crisis management. Case study: Students will work on developing a communication strategy for a development project of their own choice.

Suggested Readings:

Paul, C. (2011). Strategic Communication: Origins, Concepts, and Current Debates. Connecticut: Greenwood Publishing Group.
Farwell, J.P. (2012). Persuasion and Power: The Art of Strategic Communication. Washington: Georgetown University Press.
Allen, M. (2015). Strategic Communication for Sustainable Organizations: Theory and Practice. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
Mefalopulos, P. (2008). Development Communication Sourcebook: Broadening the Boundaries of Communication. Washington: World Bank Publications.
Wilkins, K.G. , Tufte, T. & Obregon, R. (2014). The Handbook of Development Communication and Social Change. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing.
Scott, M. (2014). Media and Development (Development Matters).London: Zed Books Ltd.

MCJ 415: Research

Objective:

The Research course aims to equip the students with the techniques of doing systematic research, both quantitative and qualitative, in the area of communication, media and journalism.

Description:

Students conduct a rigorous study under the supervision of a faculty throughout the semester. Regular meeting with the supervisor for guidance is an integral part of the course. Finally, they submit a complete monograph.

MCJ 416: Internship

Objective:

Internship helps students get a firsthand experience of working in media organizations, advertising agencies, organizations having PR departments and development organizations.

Description:

A student undergoing internship will be under the primary supervision of a teacher of the Department and guidance of a responsible person in the place of internship. S/he will submit a final report at the end of the semester. An intern will meet his supervisor at the department on a regular basis.

100 marks of Research course is divided into two parts for evaluation:

Pre-sessional – 25 marks [Meeting - 05, Literature Review - 10 and Research Proposal – 10]
Final monograph – 75 marks
Similarly, Internship course is divided into two parts for evaluation:
Pre-sessional – 25 marks (Meeting – 05, Diary- 10 and Theoretical Paper – 10]
(Theoretical Paper – in this section, the student will theorize his practical work. To accomplish this, s/he may draw on theories from the area of journalism/communication taught in other courses.)
Final report – 75 marks

MCJ 417: Comprehensive and Oral

Objectives:

The purpose of the Comprehensive and Oral examinations is to test the students’ knowledge of the courses they have studied in the four-year period.

Description:

There is no specific course work for the students to take comprehensive and oral examinations. The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to evaluate the cumulative knowledge the students have acquired through the four-year period.

There are four oral exams spread out in four different semesters. The distribution of marks is as follows:

Second semester: 10 marks
Fourth semester: 10 marks
Sixth semester: 10 marks
Eighth semester: 20 marks

Total: 50 marks

Department of Mass Communication and Journalism
Faculty of Social Sciences
University of Dhaka

Syllabus for Master of Social Science (MSS) programme in Mass Communication and Journalism

The Department of Mass Communication and Journalism offers an innovative, full-immersion Master’s programme that has placed the Department in the forefront of higher education in communication and journalism in the country.

The one-year programme is unique in scope, focus and intensity. It begins with immersion in communication theories and applications, media research and journalism skills, values and principles. Students learn how to navigate a significantly different media environment in contemporary times through classes and seminars focused on the future of media communication.

The Communication part of the programme is designed for students seeking higher-level and focused understanding of communication processes and phenomena to pursue communication-related careers in business, government, education and research, the communications industry. It focuses on a wide range of issues, such as, public relations, advertising, media policy, media criticism, advocacy, health, poverty and so on. It includes social level analysis of mainstream and alternative media as products of and influences on society; individual level analysis of psychological and physiological processes through which knowledge, attitudes and behaviours are shaped; and the creation of messages as well as how strategic messages campaigns can influence decision making and social development.

The journalism part puts emphasis on shaping and redefining the evolving field of journalism. Critical thinking, excellent writing and visual communicating are its principal features. It focuses on a variety of issues, such as, environment, development, cyberspace, arts and entertainment, journalism cultures, critical analyses of current issues and so on. Students become experts in gathering, organizing and presenting news in written or visual formats. They become competent journalists who are aware of the critical history of journalism and ethical norms and can successfully navigate their writing and visual skills across all platforms of media and also engage in education and research.

The programme is of 32 credit hours and divided into 2 semesters. It includes teaching of 8 course units for a total of 800 marks. Each full unit course carries 100 marks. Of the eight courses four are core and three optional. There are two clusters of optional courses, one of communication and the other of journalism. Students can choose three courses from either of the clusters. There is an obligatory comprehensive course, divided into two parts -- written and oral, each part carrying 50 marks. Students opting for thesis will choose one optional course from either cluster. The core courses are offered in the first semester and the optional courses in the second semester.

CORE COURSES

MCJ 501: Communication and Media Thoughts

Objective:

The course aims to give a broad view of the advances in communication and media thoughts.

Description:

It discusses theoretically the ubiquity of communication and its ramifications in relation to the processes of permanence and change in the wider spaces of culture. It attempts to read the relationships in perspective of modernity, and its various ‘posts’ – chiefly poststructuralism, postmodernism, postcolonialism and postfeminism. The course looks in depth at the salience of political economy and culturalist discourses. Alongside the discussion of pertinence and potential of the perspectives, the course analyses the ambivalence and contradictoriness in some approaches.

Suggested Readings:

Curran, J and Morley, D (eds) (2006) Media and Cultural Theory, London: Routledge
Storey, J (ed.) (2006), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Harlow, England: Pearson-Longman.
Marris, P and Thornham,S (eds) (1999) Media Studies: A Reader, Edinburg: Edinburg University Press
O’Sullivan, T and Jewkes, Y (eds) (1997), The Media Studies Reader, London: Arnold
Ashcroft, B et al. (eds) (1995), The Post-Colonial Studies Reader, London: Routledge
Nelson and Grossberg, L (eds) (1988), Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture, London: Macmillan Education Group
Sen, A (2005) The Argumentative Indian, London: Allen Lane
Said, E (1979) Orientalism, New York: Vintage
Said, E (1994) Culture and Imperialism, New York: Vintage

MCJ 502: Media Research and Cultural Analysis

Objective

This course enhances knowledge and skills of advanced research in media and cultural studies. Students will read sources detailing out methods and conduct a research project to write a monograph.

Description

It is concerned with the methods of doing different types of media research, ranging from impact/audience analysis to image analysis. Explaining the quantitative methods briefly, the course expounds the qualitative approaches. Keeping the critical and cultural approaches in perspective, it throws light on Marxist analysis, feminist methods, framing and frame analysis, psychoanalytic criticism and discourse analysis. It also addresses textual, visual and ethnographic methods including image analysis, representation, semiotics, film analysis and oral history.

Suggested Readings:

Berger, A. A. (2014). Media Analysis Techniques [Fifth Edition]. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.
Denzin, N. K. & Lincoln, Y. (eds. 2011). The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research [Fourth Edition]. Newbury Park:Sage Publications.
Jensen, K. B (ed. 2012). The Handbook of Qualitative Methodologies for Mass Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies. Oxford: Routledge.
Hall, S. (1997). Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.
Wimmer, R. and Dominick, J. (2006). Mass Media Research: An Introduction, [Illustrated Edition]. Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing Company.
Berger, J. (1972). Ways of Seeing. London: Penguine.
Rothenbuhler, W. E. and Coman, M. (eds., 2005). Media Anthropology. Newbury Park: Sage Publications.

MCJ 503: Advanced Reporting

Objective:

The aim of this course is to help students learn advanced techniques for reporting and writing news stories for the media.

Description:

The course deals with the techniques of investigation and the ways of depth reporting. It focuses on covering events in some specific areas like parliament, election, corporate organizations. Other areas may be decided by the course instructor as and when necessary. Students are asked to come up with ideas for investigative/interpretative stories, find sources they need, gather relevant information and write the stories in depth in a clear and compelling and fair fashion, adhering to the basic principles of accuracy and objectivity. The course lays emphasis on reporting exercises for both print and electronic media.

Suggested Readings:

Sheehan V., Paul (1972). Reportorial Writing. Canada, Chilton
Schulte, H. Henry (1981). Reporting Public Affairs. London, Macmillan.
ফেরদৌস, আর. সাইফুল আলম চৌধুরী, সাইফুল হক (২০১৫) দুর্নীতি, সুশাসন ও অনুসন্ধানী সাংবাদিকতা, বাংলাদেশ, টিআইবি।
গাইন, এফ. (২০০৫). রিপোর্টিং গাইড. ঢাকা. সেড।
করিম, এফ. (২০০৩).সংসদ রিপোর্টিং. ঢাকা. পিআইবি।
রহমান, জে. (২০১৫). ক্রাইম রিপোর্টিং. ঢাকা. পিআইবি।

MCJ 504: Advanced Editing

Objective:

The course aims to help the students attain maturity in editing and translating depth news and develop in them an ability to comparatively analyse news of different newspapers.

Description:

It puts emphasis in its design on news editing in newspapers in view of the fact that no one but the competent newspaper copyeditor faces challenges of the ever-changing language with so much ingenuity and no one else works under so much pressure to integrate words, pictures, graphics and design to tell compelling stories. The course enables the students to spot errors in complex copies, remove inconsistencies, redundancies and ensure clarity and cohesion. The course also focuses on the techniques of writing for electronic media, especially television, weaving the words with sounds and pictures. This necessitates understanding shots and sequences and the language of television news, guidelines for writing in television and radio, script writing techniques and preparing running order for radio and television.

The course instructor will help the students make qualitative comparative analysis of news of some newspapers to learn in depth the treatment of news, the symbiotic relationship between content and form with a view to honing the editing skills of the students.

Suggested Readings:

Hyde, G.M. (2014) Newspaper Editing: A Manual for Editors, Copyreaders, and Students of Newspaper Desk Work, New York: Createspace Independent Pub.
Ludwig, M.D. and Gilmore, G. (2005), Modern News Editing, New York: Wiley-Blackwell.
Newsom, D. &Wollert, J. A. (1985).News for the Mass Media: Media Writing. Belmont, Cal.: Wadsworth Publishing Company
Boyd, A., Stewart, P. & Alexander, R. (2008). Broadcast Journalism: Techniques of Radio and Television News (6th Edition). Oxford: Focal Press
রায়, সুধাংশু শেখর (১৯৯৪ ).সাংবাদিকতা সাংবাদিক ও সংবাদপত্র, ঢাকা: ধলেশ্বরীপ্রকাশনী
খন্দকার, রফিকুল ইসলাম (১৯৯৯).খবর লেখা ও সম্পাদনা.ঢাকা: পিআইবি
আশরাফ, খন্দকার আলী (১৯৯২).সংবাদ সম্পাদনা.ঢাকা: বাংলা একাডেমী

OPTIONAL COURSES

The optional courses are split into two clusters – Communication and Media Studies and Journalism. Students (except the thesis group) will choose three courses from either of the clusters. The thesis group students will choose one course.

Communication and Media Studies

MCJ 505: Media Economics and Management

Objective:

The course aims at familiarizing the students with the theory and practice of media economics and management.

Description:

It course examines the process of media economics and decision making through exploring industrial restructuring, regulatory constraints on media operations and providing insights into media business. With the structure and value of media industries changing rapidly, this course helps the students understand the mechanics of change, offering insight into the processes reproducing trends in media economics and management. The course sheds light on different approaches to management, Fayol’s 14 principles, factors influencing circulation and TRP, management roles, functions and skills, ethical issues in management.

Suggested Readings:

Lavine, J. M. & Wackman, D. B. (1988), Managing Media Organization, Newyork: Longman.
Picard, Robert G. (1989), Media Economics: Concepts and Issues, Sage Publications: London.
Rucker, F. W & Williams, H., L,(1979) Newspaper Organization and Management (3rd Edition), Iowa: Iowa State University Press.
Shindhwani, T., N. (1978), Newspaper Economics and Management, New Delhi: Indian Press
Alexander, A., Owers, J., Hollified, C. A. & Greco, A., N. (2004), Media Economics: Theory and Practice, Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

MCJ 506: Communication Policy and Planning

Objective:

The course gives the students a solid theoretical foundation in critical analysis of issues and trends in communication policy and planning.

Description:

It is designed to teach the students contemporary issues, prospects and problems of communication policy and planning in both international and national contexts. Students become familiar with scholarly literature and develop an insight into the relevant issues. The course addresses the following pertinent questions: what is the current state of global communication policy formulation process? What are the current perspectives? What can be done to bridge the gap between the ideal and the real in policy, planning at global to local levels? It helps the students learn how policy and planning are related to the multi-dimensionality of development and how it can incorporate gender issues. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of policy formulation in Bangladesh.

Suggested Readings:

Freedman, D. (2008). The Politics of Media Policy. Cambridge, UK: Polity Thomas L. McPhail (2006). Global Communication: Theories, Stakeholders, and Trends.
MA, USA: Blackwell Publishing.
K.B. Mathur (1994). Communication: Policy and Planning Principles. New Delhi: Allied Publishers Limited.
Ferguson, S.D. (1999). Communication Planning: An Integrated Approach. London: Sage
Sean MacBride (ed.). (1980). Many voices, one world: Communication and Society, today and tomorrow. Paris: Unesco
John Middleton (1980). Approaches to Communication Planning. Paris: Unesco

MCJ 507: Television - Context and Content

Objective:

The course aims to familiarize the students with the socio-cultural and political environment within which television works, the influences the environment has in shaping television as an institution and the nature of television content.

Description:

It discusses a considerably wide range of topics – origin and growth of television; art and science of television; language of television; political economy of television; content, context and casting, television studio; satellite and cable channels; television and nonstop news network, TV viewing practices and social impact of television. By studying the great variety of content it attempts to see the interrelationship between television and different aspects of society and culture - education, socialization, popular culture, entertainment, election, politics and so on. It also discusses the rapid growth of private channels, politics of media ownership and the future of television in Bangladesh.

Suggested Readings:

Miller, T. (2010). Television Studies The Basics. London and New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.
Allen, R.C. & Hill, A. (Eds).(2004). The Television Studies Reader. London and New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.
Janet, W. (Ed).(2010). A Companion to Television. Malden, MA, USA & Oxford & West Sussex, UK. Wiley-Blackwell: A John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Publication.
Gray, J. & D Lotz, A. (2012). Television Studies. Cambridge, UK & Malden, MA, USA: Polity Press.
Buonanno, M.(2008). The Age of Television Experiences and Theories. (Translated from Italian by Jennifer Radice). Bristol, UK/Chicago, USA: Intellect.
Kellner, D. (1990). Television and the Crisis of Democracy. Boulder, San Francisco, USA & Oxford, UK: Westview Press.

MCJ 508 - Film Sense and Criticism

Objective:

The course aims to provide students with an informed understanding of the status of film as a technology, text and art form. Students will gain a critical knowledge of how images make a multiplicity of meanings and how film grows in the matrix of society, politics and culture.

Description:

The first part of the course discusses major film theories against the backdrop of historical and contemporary debates in film studies. The lectures will focus on key theoretical approaches such as Soviet montage theory, realism, auteur theory, mise-en-scene, narrative theory, apparatus theory, Brechtian methods and self-reflexivity, poststructuralist theory, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist film theory, third cinema theory, postcolonialism, race and queer theory. The second part makes an aesthetic appreciation and analysis of some formally-innovative, experimental and socially-committed films. It throws light on specific cinematic strategies that are deployed to convey deeper meanings, enriched with the essence of socio-political realities. There will be screenings of select films throughout the semester. Students will learn how to write film criticisms.

Suggested Readings:

Monaco, James, How to Read a Film: Language, History, Theory (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)
Barsam, R. (2007). Looking at Movies: An Introduction to Film (2nd ed.). New York: W. W. Norton and Company.
Rushton, Richard and Gary Bettinson, What is Film Theory? An Introduction to Contemporary Debates (New York: Open University Press, 2010)
Leo Braudy and Marshal Cohen eds. (1999); Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings; Oxford University Press; Oxford
Mast, G. and Kawin B. F. (2008). A Short History of the Movies (10th ed.). New York: Pearson Longman.
Wayne, Mike (ed.), Understanding Film: Marxist Perspectives (London: Pluto Press, 2005)
Rodowick, D. N, The Crisis of Political Modernism: Criticism and Ideology in Contemporary Film Theory (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988)
রায়, সত্যজিৎ (২০১৫)। প্রবন্ধ সংগ্রহ। কলকাতা: আনন্দ পাবলিশার্স লিমিটেড।
নাসরীন গীতি আরা ও হক, ফাহমিদুল (২০০৮)। বাংলাদেশের চলচ্চিত্র শিল্প: সঙ্কটে জনসংস্কৃতি। ঢাকা: শ্রাবণ।
জুনাইদ, নাদির (২০১৫)। বাংলা রাজনৈতিক চলচ্চিত্র: সত্যজিৎ-ঋত্বিক-মৃণালের প্রতিবাদী ছবি। ঢাকা: বিডিনিউজ পাবলিশিং লিমিটেড।
জুনাইদ, নাদির (২০১৪)। দশটি রাজনৈতিক চলচ্চিত্র: বক্তব্য ও নির্মাণশৈলী। ঢাকা: জনান্তিক।
হক, ফাহমিদুল (২০১৭), চলচ্চিত্র পাঠ, ঢাকা: আদর্শ।
আউয়াল, সাজেদুল (২০১১), চলচ্চিত্র কলার রূপ-রূপান্তর, ঢাকা: দিব্য প্রকাশ

MCJ 509: Public Relations

Objective:

The course is designed to equip students with PR knowledge and skills, needed to build mutually beneficial relationships between organizations and their publics.

Description:

It prepares them to help the organizations/industries meet specific challenges, deal with some management problems and resolve glitches in times of crisis. It also enables them to actively participate in the decision making process. The course includes a brief survey of the emergence of public relations and discusses a wide range of topics like the process of public relations, public opinion, PR advertising, PR marketing, PR campaign and issue management. It also includes some practical classes for writing press releases. An important component of this course will be students’ field trips to different organizations which may provide them an exposure to actual working of public relations. They will be required to make a case-study of PR practice in an organization.

Suggested Readings:

Cutlip, S.M. &Center, A.H. (2005). Effective Public Relations(11th Edition). NJ: Prentice Hall
Newsom, D., Turk, J. &Kruckeberf, D. (2009).This is PR: The Realities of Public Relations (10th edition). Belmont, Cal.: Cenage/Wadsworth
Newsom, D., Scott, A. &Turk, J. (2013).This is P.R.: The Realities of Public Relation(11th edition).Belmont, Cal.: Wadsworth Publishing Co.
Seitel, F.P.(2010). The Practice of Public Relations (11th edition).NJ:Prentice Hall
Dan Lattimore, Otis Baskin, Suzette Heiman & Elizabeth Toth. (2008).Public Relations: The Profession and the Practice (5th edition). New York:McGraw-Hill

MCJ 510: Advertising

Objective:

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the sophisticated tools and methodologies needed to market a product/service in a constantly shifting context.

Description:

It addresses past and current knowledge of diversity in advertising and application of current theories to develop a communication plan and message content. It explores the wide, varied area of advertising by detailing all the components, categories and functions and it views advertising as a communication medium as well as a marketing tool. It gives an overview of the working of an advertising agency, basic principles of advertising design, campaign and media planning, building brand identity and brand failures, TVC and RDC concept development and story board writing. It evaluates advertising's role in the marketing mix, taking into account consumer behaviour and research in planning a marketing communication program; it analyses the ethical aspects of the current trends in advertising.

Suggested Readings:

Bovee L. C., & Arens F. W. (1986). Contemporary Advertising (2nd ed.). Illinois: IRWIN.
Dirksen J. C. & Kroeger A. (1968). Advertising Principles and Problems. Illinois: IRWIN.
David W. N. (1980). Advertising, planning, implementation & control (2nd ed.). Ohio: South Western Publishing.
Mohan M. (1989). Advertising Management: Concepts and cases. New Delhi: Tata McGraw -Hill Publishing.
Tiwari Sanjay (2003). The (un) Common Sense of Advertising; Getting the Basics Right. New Delhi: Response Books (A division of Sage Publications India Pvt. Ltd)

MCJ 511: Political Communication

Objective:

The course attempts to examine the mediatisation of politics and the power to mould public opinion and the policy agenda which parties, pressure groups and even governments are able to wield by mounting persuasive campaigns exploiting modern communication technologies.

Description:

It focuses on the essentially communicative aspects of governing processes, surveying research that analyzes the way in which political candidates at various levels of government are chosen, how they shape their personal image, the process of constructing persuasive message appeals, and their interaction with voters. It will also focus on how elected officials set political and legislative agendas, use public relations strategies to shape public policy, and otherwise engage in the process of political deliberation. The media in which these processes take place will be an additional focus, including the influence of news outlets, political campaign advertising, and the work of political advocacy groups of various kinds. This course also explores the rapidly evolving role of communication in political life, both nationally and internationally and looks at fundamental themes of political communication, such as agenda setting, framing, and branding.

Suggested Readings:

Esser, F., & Pfetsch, B. (Eds.). (2004). Comparing Political Communication: Theories, Cases, and Challenges. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Semetko, A. H., & Scammell, M. (Eds.). (2012). The SAGE Handbook of Political Communication. SAGE Publications Ltd.
Brants, K., & Voltmer, k. (Eds.). (2011). Political Communication in Postmodern Democracy: Challenging the Primacy of Politics. Palgrave Macmillan.
Chaffee, H. S. (1975). Political communication: issues and strategies for research. Sage Publications.
Nimmo, D. D., & Sanders, R. K. (Eds.). (1981). Handbook of Political Communication. SAGE Publications.

MCJ 512: Health and Population Communication>

Objective:

The course aims to make the students familiar with the issues of health and family planning and help them learn the ways of communicating the issues to people, professionals and policy makers.

Description:

It addresses health and population problems and family planning programmes from the communication perspective by focusing on the issues that have direct bearing on the country’s growth and development and the pertinent part of communication as a tool for treating the ticklish aspects of health and family planning. The course throws light on health and F.P. situation and government policy. It delineates the concepts, theories, models and strategies of health and FP communication. Amongst its wide range of topics are included demographic transition; three eras of FP; FP methods; taboo communication; homophily, heterophily and credibility; reproductive health; HIV/AIDS; communicating drug issues. It puts special emphasis on counselling, communication with patients, professionals and policy makers.

Suggested Readings:

Zope,Jr.Paul E (1984) , Population: An Introduction to Social Demograpy, Mayfield Publishing Co. ,USA
E.M Rogers (1974) , Communication Strategy for Family Planning, New York Free Press,
Piotrow PT; Kincaid DL; Rimon JG 2d; Rinehart W; Samson K.(1997) Health Communication: Lessons from Family Planning and Reproductive Health, John Hopkins Center for communication Program, USA
Berry Dianne (2007) , Health Communication Theory and Practice, Open University Press, Berkshire, England
Bangladesh National Population Policy (2012), Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Govt. of Bangladesh, Dhaka
জাতীয় স্বাস্থ্য নীতি (২০১১), স্বাস্থ্য ও পরিবার কল্যাণ মন্ত্রণালয় , গণপ্রজাতন্ত্রী বাংলাদেশ সরকার, ঢাকা।

MCJ 513: Media Literacy and Advocacy

Objective:

The course aims to examine issues of media literacy and media advocacy and the relevant approaches to raising people’s critical perception of media’s role, media content and presentation and ways of advancing public issues through media for social justice.

Description:

This course has two parts: media literacy and media advocacy. The first part deals with the nature of education for media literacy that often uses a pedagogic model encouraging people to ask questions about what they receive from the media. The course demonstrates how media literacy enables people to critically analyze messages, broaden their experience of media, and develop creative skills in making media messages. Throwing light on the ideological underpinnings of media literacy, the course discusses different approaches like the protectionist approach, media arts education, media literacy movement and critical media literacy. It also discusses media literacy interventions and their impact on knowledge, criticism and attitudinal changes.

The second part deals with media advocacy, which involves use of media by social justice advocates and organizations to communicate with the broader sections of the people in order to promote a public policy objective or change the people’s attitudes towards important public issues. It examines the relationship between advocacy, power and politics. It discusses how to broaden constituencies for support, neutralize opposition and influence decision-makers. It throws light on important elements of social justice messages, developing core and tailored messages and putting frame round the issues and cultivating good media relations. It takes into account association of media advocacy with legitimacy, credibility, transparency and accountability.

Suggested Readings:

Buckingham, D. (2012). Media education: Literacy, learning, and contemporary culture. Cambridge: Polity.
Macedo, D. P. (2007). Media literacy: A reader. New York: Peter Lang.
Tyner, K. R. (2010). Media literacy: New agendas in communication. New York: Routledge.
Reinsborough, P., & Canning, D. (2010). RE:imagining change: How to use story-based strategy to win campaigns, build movements, and change the world. Oakland, CA: PM Press.
Gregory, S. (2005). Video for change: A guide for advocacy and activism. London: Pluto Press in association with Witness.

MCJ 514: Advanced Video Production

Objective:

The course aims to help the students understand the production process from both theoretical and practical perspectives and make them capable of creating videos rich in content and form.

Description:

It puts emphasis on hands-on experience. It focuses on creating videos covering events like sports, natural disaster and other events of human interest. Students will produce several types of video projects such as short video, video storytelling and commercials. They will work individually as well as in groups to produce video stories. As an integral part of the course they will make a video of their own choice and submit it for evaluation towards the end of the semester.

Pre requisite: Only those students who have completed MCJ 405 can enrol in this course.

Suggested Readings:

Dancyger, K. (2011). The Technique of Film & Video Editing: History, Theory, and Practice (Fifth Edition). MA, USA: Focal Press
Hines, W.E. (1999).Job descriptions for Film, Video & CGI. Los Angeles, CA: Venture Books
Owens, J. (2011). Video Production Handbook (Fifth edition). MA, USA: Focal Press
Musburger, R.B.& Ogden, M.R. (2014). Single- Camera Video Production (Sixth edition). MA, USA: Focal Press Journalism

MCJ 515: Peace Journalism

Objectives:

This course aims to help students understand how media writing and reporting can promote peace and prevent conflict.

Description:

It is concerned with the practice of peace journalism as an alternative to the prejudices of conventional conflict reporting with a value bias towards violence. This course discusses methods for correcting the bias by producing conflict sensitive journalism in both mainstream and alternative media. Alongside the critical analysis of conflicts like human rights abuse, labour-owner conflict, ethnic and religious division, inter-party conflict and other forms of conflict, the course the course puts adequate emphasis on reporting and writing exercises in line with the imperatives of peace journalism.

Suggested Readings:

Lynch, Jake and McGoldrick, Annabel, (2005), Peace Journalism, Hawthorn Press, UK.
Hoskins, Andrew and O’Loughlin, Ben, (2010), War and Media: The Emergence of Diffused War, Polity Press, UK.
Wolfsfeld, Gadi, (1997), The Media and Political Conflict, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, UK.
Robinson, Piers, (2002), The CNN Effect: The Myth of News, Foreign Policy and Intervention, Routledge Publications, New York and London.
Spencer, Graham, (2005), Media and Peace, Palgrave Macmillan, Hampshire, New York.
Tumber, Howard, and Palmer, Jerry, (2004), Media at War: The Iraq Crisis, SAGE Publications, London.
Hess, Stephen, and Kalb, Marvin, eds, (2003), The media and The War on Terrorism, Brookings Institution Press, Washington D.C.
Chomsky, Noam, (1991), Media Control: The Spectacular Achievements of Propaganda, Seven Stories Press, New York.

MCJ 516: Development Journalism

Objective:

The course attempts to familiarize the students with contemporary trends and practices in the field of development journalism.

Description:

It equips them with the knowledge, skills and techniques required for writing development reports and features. Topics such as new concepts in journalism, advocacy journalism, and grass roots journalism are broadly analysed, while the contemporary practices and concerns are examined in depth. Throughout this course students are encouraged to make frequent field visits and write reports and features on a regular basis. There are reporting assignments on a wide range of issues including gender concerns, children rights, human rights, environment, good governance, health and nutrition, micro-finance, land rights, disaster management, rural empowerment, traditional media, right to communication, and minority issue.

Suggested Readings:

Kunkzigk, M. (1988). Concepts of Journalism: North and South. Bonn: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).
Gidreta, A.D. (2011). Development Journalism: Acceptability and implementation. Berlin: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller
Dinesh C. Sharma (2007). Development Journalism: An Introduction. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University.

MCJ 517: Climate and Environment Journalism

Objective:

The course familiarizes the students with different aspects of climate and environment journalism and helps them learn how to write news and features on relevant issues.

Description:

It helps them gain a deeper understanding of the field of environmental journalism. Students learn how to handle stories, translate scientific jargon and find the best sources for stories and features. They will know how to look for environmental angles in a wide range of news stories and how to conduct effective interviews with environmental experts for their own writing.

Students of this course will also get familiar with the changing trends of environment and climate in local and global perspectives by reading journalistic writings, reports, features and articles and watching documentaries. Particular emphasis will be laid on knowing and writing about global warming, renewable energy, green living and design, health and environment, recycling, biodiversity / conservation, nuclear energy and waste, activism and volunteering, environmental actions, environmental law/policy, top environmental issues of the decade, greenhouse effect and climate change. The teacher will evaluate the students’ writing exercises as well as their reading of selected news, features and articles.

Suggested Readings:

Acharya, K and Noronha, F (2010), The Green Pen: Environmental Journalism in India and South Asia, New Delhi: Sage Publications.
Frome, M, Green Ink: An Introduction to Environmental Journalism, University of Utah Press.
Lester, L. (2010). Media and the Environment. Cambridge: Polity Press.
McKibben, Bill (2003) The End of Nature, London: Bloomsbury
Christ, Eileen and Rinker, H. Bruce (2010) (eds), Gaia in Turmoil, Cambridge: MIT Press
Hansen, A. (2010). Environment, Media and Communication. London: Routledge.
Journals and Newspapers: Environment 360, Grist, Orion, the Washington Post, the Independent

MCJ 518: Arts and Entertainment Journalism

Objective:

This course aims at giving the students a good grounding in different aspects of arts and entertainment reporting and criticism.

Description:

Those who have a passion for theatre, film, music, television, dance and other art forms, are encouraged to take this inter-disciplinary course with a focus on reporting the cultural events, celebrated persons in the cultural sphere and reviewing cultural output. They learn how to write lively, relevant stories of arts and entertainment in national and global contexts for newspapers and magazines. They focus on the types of stories that are most common in cultural reporting and stories that examine the connection between cultural events and the broader society.

This course attempts to give the students an insight into the philosophy of art, which may of use in sharpening their aesthetic sense and writing snappy reviews, critical essays on arts for the press. It discusses the dominant issues at play in arts criticism today as well as the publications in which they are being addressed.

Suggested Readings:

Harris, John. The Last Party: Britpop, Blair, and the Demise of English Rock (Fourth Estate, 2003)
Ian Macdonald. Revolution in the Head: The Beatles’ Records and the Sixties (Henry Holt and Co, 1994)
Morgan, Piers. Don’t You Know Who I Am? (Ebury Press, 2007)
Titchener, Campbell. Reviewing the Arts (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2005)

MCJ 519: Narrative Journalism

Objective:

The course aims to familiarize the students with the form and content of narrative journalism, sharpen their sense of looking at the deeper layers of newsworthy events and enable them to write in a creative, innovative style.

Description:

The narrative form differs from the structural conventions of daily news in many respects and lays emphasis on deeper and more sophisticated reporting, a perceptive recognition of storytelling and an imaginative, creative use of language. Students of this course explore the art and craft of long-form storytelling. As an integral part of the course they will write their own pieces. They study the techniques of well-known nonfiction writers and write polished news stories/articles based on character, plot, scene and dialogue. They will pay particular attention to the selection of topics, examine the practicalities of the craft and learn about the controlled delivery and interplay of the elements used in narratives. Besides writing narratives they will read selected narratives; the course instructor will evaluate the depth of their reading.

Suggested Readings:

Bloom Stephen G, Inside the Writer’s Mind: Writing Narrative Journalism, Iowa State Press, 2002
Boynton Robert S, The New New Journalism: Conversations with America’s Best Nonfiction Writers About the Craft, New York Vintage Books, 2005
Weingarten Marc, The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight: Wolfe, Thompson, Didion, and the New Journalism Revolution. New York Crown Publishers, 2006
Jon Krakauer, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster. New York: First Anchor Books, 1999
Capote Truman, In Cold Blood, New York Random House, 1966

MCJ 520: Global Journalism Cultures

Course Objective:

The course is designed to give an understanding of the contemporary journalism practices and cultures across the world.

Course Description:

It takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying contemporary journalism cultures. It explores the difficulties and opportunities for journalists at work in different cultural settings, patterns of their interaction at different levels of society, their professional integrity, resilience and reaction while performing their duties, their role playing within and outside the media, ambivalence between conscience and conformity to the rules of establishment, their attitudes and outlooks, the emphases they put on global and national news. To understand the state of journalism cultures in proper perspectives this course creates in the students an awareness of the social history of journalism.

Recommended books:

Obijiofor, Levi and Hanusch, Folker (2011), Journalism across Cultures, Palgrave MacMillan: Basingstoke, UK
Tunstall, Jeremy (1971), Journalists at Work: Specialist Correspondents: Their News Organizations, News Sources, and Competitor-Colleagues. London: Constable.
Jeremy Tunstall (1970), Media Sociology, University of Illinois Press.

MCJ 521 Court and Parliament Reporting

Objective:

The objective of the course is to provide the students knowledge and skill, needed for reporting issues related to court and parliament.

Description:

The course has two parts – court and parliament. The court part deals with the structure of the court system and reporting criminal and civil cases. Students will acquire good knowledge of relevant laws. They learn how to work in the background, take thorough notes in the court and make a note of the legal terms that are not easily understood. While writing reports, they will avoid using legalese and write with clarity.

In the parliament part, apart from main government bills, the course will deal with areas like select committees, question time, government statements, ministerial statements, private member’s bills, parliamentary motions, state opening of parliament, addresses given by head of state, conferences, talking directly to politicians and so on. Parliament is a place where not only political and economic issues, but also a lot of human interest stories occur. Students will be systematically guided in reporting different aspects of parliament with dedication, skill and knowledge of parliamentary procedures and the constitution.

Suggested Readings:

McCormick,R.W., Knapp, M.H., &Blake, M.H. (2009).The Complete Court Reporter's Handbook and Guide for Realtime Writers (5th Edition). London: Pearson
Boucke, L. (2006).Brief Encounters: A Dictionary for Court Reporting(4th Edition by). CA, USA: White-Boucke Publishing

MCJ 522: Sports Journalism

Objective:

The course is designed to help the students learn the techniques of sports reporting.

Description:

It is designed to help the students learn the art of reporting sports in multiple forms including narrative, with a view to giving the readers a vicarious pleasure. The course covers mainly news and features about players, places and issues related to sports. Alongside the writing exercises, the students are asked to read good stories on sports and watch sports on television. The instructor will make an evaluation of the depth and seriousness of the students in reading the stories, selected by the instructor. They will get familiar with the rules of different games and understand the politics, sociology, economics and ethics of sports.

Suggested Readings:

Reinardy, S.&Wanta, W. (2015). The Essentials of Sports Reporting and Writing (second edition). New York: Routledge
Stofer, K.T., Schaffer, J.R., &Rosenthal, B.A. (2010). Sports Journalism. UK: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.v

MCJ 522: Sports Journalism

Objective:

The course aims to help the students identify and analyze storytelling techniques and tools adopted by the news industry to take advantage of the opportunities offered by digital technologies.

Description:

The course discusses the digital revolution and the global Information Society, with a focus on the effects these phenomena may have on the media in general, and on journalism in particular. Students grasp the nature of journalism in a new media ecosystem.

They are given access to tools to work with narratives in tune with the new mediascape. They learn how to develop multimedia projects, working with different formats, such as text, hypertext, photos, video, animation, databases, etc. Digital technology training will be given in journalistic contexts, such as responsible reporting, clear writing, critical thinking and ethical issues.

Suggested Readings:

Andy Bull (2010). Multimedia Journalism: A Parctical Guide. London: Routledge.
Richard Kochi Harnandez and Jeremi Rue (2015). The Principals of Multimedia Journalism. London: Routledge.

MCJ 524: Science Reporting

Objective:

This course discusses different aspects of science reporting and writing from a practical perspective, with a mix of information and entertainment.

Description:

Students learn how to find stories and gather information through research and interview. They learn how to get started and deal with the elements of the structure of the story. The course throws light on the nitty-gritty of writing and refinement of the draft. The attitude of the science reporter is important; the quality of writing depends on how interested the reporter is in new developments, discoveries and breakthroughs in science. They are trained here in reporting local initiatives in science, environment, new technologies and human interaction with technology and so on. They will write mainly news, feature and long-form narrative. They will be required to read relevant news and features selected by the course instructor.

Suggested Readings:

Blum, D., Knudson, M., &Henig, R.M. (eds.) (2005). A Field Guide for Science Writers. Oxford: Oxford University Press
Zinsser, W. (2016). On Writing Well (30th Anniversary edition). New York: Harper Perennial
Hancock, E. (2003). Ideas into Words: Mastering the Craft of Science Writing. MD, USA: Johns Hopkins University Press
Huff, D. (1993). How to Lie With Statistics, (Reissue edition). New York: W. W. Norton & Company
Kahneman, D. (2013). Thinking, Fast and Slow. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

MCJ 525: Advanced Photojournalism

Objective:

The course aims to produce trained and skilled photo journalists who will enter the professional photography and attain a higher technical and creative level.

Description:

The students will learn about all the different areas of photography from Flash Photography to Architecture and Portraiture. The course is a combination of indoor and outdoor practical exercises. The students will work on in-depth visual storytelling project and try to develop a personal style. The course will also offer hands-on training in documentary photography.

Pre requisite: Only those students who have completed MCJ 406 can enrol in this course.

Suggested Readings:

Frizot, M. (ed.)(1998).A New History of Photography. Köln: Könemann.
Hall, D.&Fifer, S.J. (eds.) (2005).Illuminating Video: An Essential Guide to Video Art. USA: Aperture
Johnson, E.(ed.)(1995). Modern Art and the Object: A Century of Changing Attitudes. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press
Rush, M. (2003). Video Art. London: Thames and Hudson
Barnbaum, B. (2010). The Art of Photography: An Approach to Personal Expression. California: Rocky Nook
Kobre, K. (2016). Photojournalism: The Professionals' Approach(7th Edition). MA, USA: Focal Press

MCJ 526: Thesis

The thesis is an important optional component of the requirements for students seeking to obtain the MSS degree. It asks the students to deal with specific research questions by making systematic queries, hypotheses, investigations and interpretations. The thesis must be original and reach the desired level of scholarly accomplishment, demonstrating the researcher’s grounding in methodology and theory.

The assessment of a thesis is made in the following way:

Examination of the dissertation: 50 marks
Supervisor’s continuous evaluation: 25 marks
Viva-voce: 25 marks

Total: 100 marks